Test tube burger ready later this year

From Fiona Macrae on the Daily Mail Online:

Click image to go to the mail story.

The world’s first test-tube burger will be ready to eat within months.

It will look, feel and, it is hoped, taste, like a regular quarter-pounder, its creator Mark Post told the world’s premier science conference.

He plans to unveil the hamburger in October – and hopes celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal will cook it, although he has yet to approach him.

The ‘ethical meat’ will would be kinder to the environment than the real thing, reduce animal suffering and help feed the world’s burgeoning population.

But it will be far from cheap with the prototype burger costing £220,000 to produce.

Professor Post says that ‘everyone’ will want to eat the burgers, which, despite their vast initial cost could eventually be priced to match that of real meat.

However, it remains to be seen whether a public that likes to think of its chops, steaks and sausages as having their roots in nature will take to meat made in test-tubes.

The Maastricht Univeristy professor has spent the last six years trying to turn stem cells – ‘master cells’ with the power to turn into all other cell types – into meat.

He first attempts involved mouse burgers. He then tried to grow pork in a dish, producing strips with the rubbery texture of squid or scallops, before settling on beef.

A four-step technique is used to turn stem cells from animal flesh into a burger.

First, the stem cells are stripped from the cow’s muscle.

Next, they are incubated in a nutrient broth until they multiply many times over, creating a sticky tissue with the consistency of an undercooked egg.

This ‘wasted muscle’ is then bulked up through the laboratory equivalent of exercise – it is anchored to Velcro and stretched….”

Read it all on The Daily Mail Online.

4 Comments

Filed under News

4 responses to “Test tube burger ready later this year

  1. Annie Bartley

    EEEEKEKKEKEKEKEKEKEKKEKE

  2. John

    Not to worry. Most of these tissue culture systems require supplementation with ~ 15% fetal bovine serum (collected when pregnant cows are slaughtered). There is barely enough of this for medical research as it is (since most cattle slaughtered for meat are not pregnant). Lots of practical and ethical reasons why this will never be anything but ‘pie in the sky’ (IMHO).

  3. Kathy C.

    Too much tampering with food!

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