Big food must go — or why we need to radically change the way we are eating

From Christopher D. Cook on AlterNet:

February 26, 2012  Editor’s note: Find Christopher D. Cook’s book, Diet for a Dead Planet: Big Business and the Coming Food Crisishere.

A few examples of Big Food. Picture via AlterNet.

“It is no longer news that a few powerful corporations have literally occupied the vast majority of human sustenance. The situation is perilous: nearly all of human food production, seeds, food processing and sales, is run by a handful of for-profit firms which, like any capitalist enterprise, function to maximize profit and gain ever-greater market share and control. The question has become: What do we do about this disastrous alignment of pure profit in something so basic and fundamental to human survival?

It is time — now, not next year — to de-occupy Walmart. And Archer Daniels Midland. And Tyson Foods. And Monsanto. And Cargill. And Kraft Foods. And the other large corporations that decide what ends up on our plates. Take all our money out, public and personal, from our shopping dollars to school district lunch contracts to the corporate subsidies that uphold these firms’ grip on our food supply, and invest it in a new system that’s economically diverse and ecologically sustainable.

These corporations’ stranglehold over food has wreaked havoc on the environment, our health, farmers, workers, and our very future. It is time for an end to Big Food, and a societal shift to something radically different. We all deserve a future where what we eat feeds community and land, instead of eroding soils, polluting water and air, and tossing away small farmers and immigrant workers as if they were balance sheet losers.

“Occupying the food system” has emerged as a rallying cry as activists and movements across the country, from Willie Nelson to more than 60 Occupy groups are turning up the heat on “big food” in nationwide actions today. Across the US, online and offline, thousands will be protesting icons of corporate control over food such as Monsanto and Cargill, and literally occupying vacant lots and tilling long-ignored soils in a mass-scale rejuvenation of community-led food production. (Find out more about the day of action here.)

“We want to ignite a robust conversation about corporate control of our food supply,” says Laurel Sutherlin, communications manager for Rainforest Action Network, a lead organizer in this growing coalition of food system occupiers. “Occupy has opened a national dialogue about inequality and the dangers of surrendering our basic life-support systems over to corporate control.”…”

Read it all on AlterNet.

3 Comments

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3 responses to “Big food must go — or why we need to radically change the way we are eating

  1. I totally agree; if we keep this up, we are all headed down a bad road!

  2. deen

    Much bigger picture to look at folks.

    When folks try to get back to common or natural law and move away from what is know as Napoleonic Code or Roman law we will begin to understand.
    Until that happens corporations will continue to destroy.

  3. Pingback: Three quarters of a million bucks fine for hapless downloader « FinBlog

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