Raw milk in “The New Yorker”

From Dana Goodyear, at the Culture Desk at The New Yorker:

“…In Barber’s experience, though, whether or not milk is pasteurized is secondary to what the cow—in his view, a “vector for the grass”—eats: not only are pasture-fed ruminants eating food they evolved to digest, but also their milk reflects the subtle, seasonal changes in the field.

“Grain-feeding is a little like pasteurization,” he said. “It’s a dumbing down, an evening out of the flavors.” In the battle over raw milk, which I write about in the magazine this week, Barber sees a more important point being lost. “The picture is not just about pasteurization,” he said. “It’s part of a much larger question about how you’re raising the cattle and what quality of milk you’re trying to produce.

To some people, having a U.S.D.A. official tell you that you have to heat the milk to a certain point takes away your American right to live, but I’d say you have a much more egregious problem if you’re importing transgenic grain from Iowa and polluting the Gulf of Mexico with so much nitrogen that it’s causing dead zones.”…”

Read it all in The New Yorker
.

3 Comments

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3 responses to “Raw milk in “The New Yorker”

  1. Pingback: Grass smells take me home to the farm…..a rambling « Writing for my beloved

  2. Pingback: Got Soap? Beauty and Milk « Eden's Rivers

  3. Pingback: raw milk and defining government relationships « JRFibonacci's blog: partnering with reality

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