How will the dairy oligarchs defend their turf against raw milk intruders?

David E. Gumpert, of The Complete Patient blog, thinks it will be by amping up the fear factor. From his latest post:

“The proposed legislation to rescind or liberalize the federal ban on interstate raw milk sales holds out the prospect of a national debate on raw milk.

How so? There will need to be one or more hearings on the legislation before the House committee with responsibility for the legislation.

An aide to Kentucky Cong.[Congressman] Thomas Massie, who is leading the bipartisan “Milk Freedom” legislative effort, says he doesn’t have a specific timetable for when hearings could be held, but emailed me, “We hope sooner rather than later.” The hearings would be held before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

I’m not sure Cong. Massie and his coalition of 18 other conservatives and liberals fully appreciate what they have gotten themselves into. The debate growing out of their well intentioned legislation to get the federal government out of policing raw milk won’t be pretty. In fact, it will likely be downright ugly.

Given the corporate dairy industry’s immediate negative reaction to the legislation, all dirty options are open. The industry could get its committee members on the Big Ag payroll to bury the legislation without a hearing. But if a hearing comes together, I think it is fair to say it could be, how shall we say, contentious.

The dairy industry has already telegraphed its strategy: a full-scale, bare knuckle, blood-and-guts, full-court press with fear mongering on a level that will be a surprise to much of the general public. Of course, those who follow this blog know well what the industry, and its captive patrons, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, are capable of when it comes to fear mongering.

The president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation put it this way: “If this measure passes, those most vulnerable to dangerous pathogens – children – are the ones who will suffer the most. The benefits of consuming raw milk are illusory, but the painful costs of illness and death are very real. Consumption of raw milk is a demonstrated public health risk. The link between raw milk and foodborne illness has been well‐documented in the scientific literature, with evidence spanning nearly 100 years.

Translation: If your Congressional representative votes in favor of this legislation, blood will be on his or her hands because kids will die. …”

More on The Complete Patient blog.

1 Comment

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One response to “How will the dairy oligarchs defend their turf against raw milk intruders?

  1. william

    Really? That is a bit of too much drama for me……
    As I have posted before: slow pasteurization is the way to go. Big government knows this will be the compromise to the distribution of whole milk. Raw milk has too many liability issues. Safety is the gov’ts job to be sure ALL (or most) of our food is safe. Raw milk has too many extranalities to contend with.

    But saying that: it is ‘legal’ to drink raw milk in North America. You cannot distribute raw milk to others. However, if you are truly determined and want to prove to the gov’t you are serious. Perhaps milk your own animal everyday, like we do and drink it. Until the masses star’acting’ and doing their part. I don’t think the gov’t will take this issue seriously.
    In the meantime, farms in Vermont, New york State and Pennsylvania will continue switching over from raw milk to slow pasteurization…..
    The enzymes and good bacteria and nutrition are 80+% there. And no chance of deadly pathogens…..

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