Tag Archives: A1A2

Making Camembert in Chicago with raw milk from Amish Guernsey cows

Here’s an excerpt from a story by Doug Taron from his Gossamer Tapestry blog. Doug may not realize it but one of the significant characteristics of Guernsey milk is that it tends to have more A2 Beta Casein than A1. Look for our upcoming review of the new book “Devil in the Milk” for a full exegesis on what that means, or enter A1A2 in the search box to read our earlier stories on the subject:

Raw Guernsey Organic Amish milk makes the difference for great Camembert.

Raw Guernsey Organic Amish milk makes the difference for great Camembert.

“I just finished another batch of Camembert. I’ve now done enough of these to know that they are consistently coming out well. Some of myearliest efforts were delicious and developed the surface mold well- but the interior was excessively runny, sometimes to the point of being nearly liquid. My more recent efforts have been especially successful. Continue reading

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Insights on pasteurization effects from the new A1, A2 book “Devil in the Milk”

While this book is not primarily about the raw vs pasteurized question, it does offer some fascinating epidemiological evidence that sheds light on the nutritional quality compromises involved in pasteurizing milk:

New book on A1 & A2 milk

New book on A1 & A2 milk

From page 70: “… Corran McLaughlan puts forward a suggestion in his Medical Hypotheses paper that both the historical increase and subsequent decrease in levels of heart disease worldwide might be linked to the method of pasteurization. He drew together evidence from a range of sources to show that, as pasteurization was introduced in various countries and regions within countries, within a few years there was a marked increase in the level of heart disease. Prior to 1950 the major method of pasteurization was the Holder method (the milk was heated to 63 degrees C for about 30 minutes). Subsequently the method fell out of favour, largely because of the distinctive ‘cooked’ flavour it gave to the milk. In the 1960s there was a move to short-time, high-temperature methods, (about 90 degrees C for 15 seconds) and by 1980 these had become predominant. This change was soon followed by a decline in heart disease levels cannot be satisfactorily explained in terms of the classic risk factors for heart disease. Continue reading

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“The Devil in the Milk” — Dr. Thomas Cowan on how the A1 – A2 factor explains why even raw milk sometimes does not seem to be enough of an improvement over “store-bought”

The trouble is that we have “the wrong kind of cows”. It seems the black and white cows — Holsteins and Friesians — generally give milk that contains a small but significant amount of beta-casein type A1, which behaves like an opiate and which epidemiological studies have implicated in heart disease, Type 1 diabetes, autism and schizophrenia. This is big news, folks. Heart disease is the leading cause of death. This is like cigarettes and cancer. Dr. Thomas Cowan, co-founder of the Weston A. Price Foundation has published this fascinating introduction to the subject in his email newsletter:

Devil in the Milk

Devil in the Milk

“I have been involved in thinking about the medicinal aspects of cow’s milk virtually my entire career. As one four-year-old child pointed out to me many years ago, “Mommy, I know why he always talks about milk, his name is Cow—an.” So, I guess this milk “obsession” is no surprise. 

The obsession started in earnest about 25 years ago when I read the book The Milk of Human Kindness Is Not Pasteurized by maverick physician William Campbell Douglass, MD. This was one of the most influential books I have ever read. I became convinced that a large part of the disease in this country is related to the way we handle, or rather mishandle, milk and milk products. Raw and cultured dairy products from healthy grass-fed cows are one of the healthiest foods people have ever eaten. It is the very foundation of western civilization (not that this is necessarily so good). On the other hand, pasteurized, particularly low-fat, milk products have caused more disease than perhaps any other substance people are generally in contact with. This view was re- enforced when I met and joined up with Sally Fallon and learned the principles of the Weston A. Price Foundation. End of story, I thought – I could stop thinking about milk.  Continue reading

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Dr. Ron Hull Ph.D. on raw milk safety

Dr. Ron Hull was one of Michael Schmidt’s expert witnesses at the recent trial and he also spoke at the International Raw Milk Symposium in Toronto on January 31, 2009. Before he left for Australia after the trial, we interviewed him for The Bovine:

Dr. Ron Hull, Ph.D., Microbiological scientist supports feasibility of safe raw milk in Ontario.

Dr. Ron Hull, Ph.D., a microbiologist from Australia, supports the feasibility of safe raw milk in Ontario.

Dr. Hull has a Ph.D in Microbiology and runs a company – Ron Hull and Associates – which does consulting work with Australian dairy producers and other food industry clients. Before starting his own business he worked for many years as a research scientist with Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), specializing in microbiology in the realm of food science, dealing with germs, bacteria, and pathogens.

Regarding the Michael Schmidt case and the feasibility of producing and marketing farm fresh unpasteurized milk, Dr. Hull states that the Crown’s own documentation shows that about 95% of Ontario’s conventional dairy farms are pathogen free. The problem arises when milk from the other five percent is mixed with the pathogen-free milk in tanker trucks and milk storage silos. Dr. Hull supports the concept that there be two types or two streams of raw milk, one produced under carefully controlled management specifically for raw consumption and another produced under the present standards, destined for pasteurization. Continue reading

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