Tag Archives: ecology

Is there an anti-human agenda behind all that blather about “sustainability”?

It does sound like the grave diggers of civilization are at it again:

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Protecting the grey rat snake in Ontario

From “letters” section Frontenac News  8 March 2012:

Recently, the Ontario Ministry of Natural resources (MNR) proposed new regulations to protect the gray rat snake. These regulations include three levels of exclusion zones around the snakes’ habitat reaching out as far as one kilometre from their known haunts. And just in case if you forgot how the MNR works, these regulations will restrict or prevent what you can do on your private property without compensation if a gray rat snake is found within 1000 meters of your land.

But what many people don’t know is the way that the MNR determines whether a species should be protected or not. A committee, all of whose members receive handsome per diems, looks at five criteria to determine whether a species in Ontario should be protected. However the committee and MNR do no research or studies themselves, but rely on information provided by the federal government. Continue reading

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Time to end the war against the earth

From Vandana Shiva, an edited version of her talk last night at the Sydney Opera House, as published on TheAge.com.au. Thanks to Raoul Bedi for bringing this story to our attention:

Vandana Shiva, Indian food activist, from " Sydney Peace Prize". Click for source.

When we think of wars in our times, our minds turn to Iraq and Afghanistan. But the bigger war is the war against the planet. This war has its roots in an economy that fails to respect ecological and ethical limits – limits to inequality, limits to injustice, limits to greed and economic concentration. Continue reading

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Cell phones blamed for the bee deaths

From the Inhabitat website:

Bees seem to get confused by cellphone transmissions. Photo via Inhabitat website.

“Scientists may have found the cause of the world’s sudden dwindling population of bees – and cell phones may be to blame. Research conducted in Lausanne, Switzerland has shown that the signal from cell phones not only confuses bees, but also may lead to their death. Over 83 experiments have yielded the same results. With virtually most of the population of the United States (and the rest of the world) owning cell phones, the impact has been greatly noticeable. Continue reading

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Talking about the advent of GE Alfalfa

Talking ’bout GE Alfalfa with Deepak Chopra:

Click image above to go to page where you can view video.

Hat tip to Raine Saunders.

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Farmer Wendell Berry honoured in U.S.

Fred Clark, writing on The Slacktivist blog:

“That picture there (by AP photographer Charles Dharapak) shows President Barack Obama presenting Wendell Berry with a 2010 National Humanities Medal on Wednesday at the White House.

Wendell Berry scares me. He is a poet, novelist, essayist, farmer, husband, conservationist, radical and gentleman. He writes with an unrivaled clarity of language, clarity of thought and clarity of conviction. It’s that conviction that scares me, because often when I read Wendell Berry I can’t help but think that if he is right, then a great deal of the rest of the world is wrong. And he usually seems to be right.

His Port Royal novels are gently beautiful, slowly building a world that sneaks up on you. But his collections of essays are probably my favorites. Let me recommend Home Economics, What Are People For?, The Hidden Wound and, oh let’s say, Sex, Economy, Freedom and Community, for starters. Continue reading

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Foodies are the new environmentalists

Time Magazine on how the foodies have picked up the baton from the largely failed environmental movement:

“…..Even as traditional environmentalism struggles, another movement is rising in its place, aligning consumers, producers, the media and even politicians. It’s the food movement, and if it continues to grow it may be able to create just the sort of political and social transformation that environmentalists have failed to achieve in recent years.

That would mean not only changing the way Americans eat and the way they farm — away from industrialized, cheap calories and toward more organic, small-scale production, with plenty of fruits and vegetables — but also altering the way we work and relate to one another. To its most ardent adherents, the food movement isn’t just about reform — it’s about revolution. Continue reading

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