Tag Archives: taste

Vermont cheesemonger on how only the French get the real (raw milk) Brie

From the Commons Online:

“BRATTLEBORO—YOU MIGHT THINK it’s very odd that a cheesemonger would tell you not to buy a cheese, but here I go: if you’re going to shell out the bucks to buy brie, you’re better off spending that money on another variety.

Now, there’s really nothing wrong with brie… if you’re in France. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration’s regulations on dairy products, if a cheese is made of unpasteurized milk, it has to be aged for at least 60 days.

But real brie is made of unpasteurized milk, and it’s aged for just a few weeks. (At 60 days aged, you wouldn’t want it. It’ll have the distinct and powerful aroma and flavor of ammonia, except you can’t wash the floor with it. Don’t bother trying to trim it — just throw it away.) Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under News

Raw milk in “The New Yorker”

From Dana Goodyear, at the Culture Desk at The New Yorker:

“…In Barber’s experience, though, whether or not milk is pasteurized is secondary to what the cow—in his view, a “vector for the grass”—eats: not only are pasture-fed ruminants eating food they evolved to digest, but also their milk reflects the subtle, seasonal changes in the field.

“Grain-feeding is a little like pasteurization,” he said. “It’s a dumbing down, an evening out of the flavors.” In the battle over raw milk, which I write about in the magazine this week, Barber sees a more important point being lost. “The picture is not just about pasteurization,” he said. “It’s part of a much larger question about how you’re raising the cattle and what quality of milk you’re trying to produce. Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under News

“It’s milk, Jim, but not as we know it”

Thursday’s story about the raw milk vending machines in Poland attracted quite a lot of interest among Bovine readers. In fact it was the top story of the week with 1,383 page views as of Sunday morning. Which brings us ’round to today’s article, which likewise deals with raw milk vending machines, but this time in England. You may remember there was a bit of flap over there recently about a big store which had the temerity to install such a machine in one of its London stores. Well here’s more news arising from that self-same machine, which seems to still be dispensing raw milk, right there in the heart of London. And perhaps surprisingly, from a North American perspective, the London Bobbies don’t seem to have their knickers in a knot over that simple fact of life:

From Tom Parker Bowles on The Mail Online UK:

The Times' caption for this picture reads like advertising copy for raw milk: "The first taste is a revelation, rich, bounteous and fulsome"

“The machine, nearly 6ft of solid, gleaming steel, sits just to the left of Oddono’s ice cream in London’s Selfridges. And is a mere Tunworth’s roll from the groaning cheese counter.  Which seems entirely apt, as this magnificent monolith dispenses milk, the heart and soul of them both. But this is no run-of-the-mill dairy dullard; it’s a repository of raw, unpasteurised milk from Sussex – buxom, beguiling cowgirl rather than joyless, emaciated waif.

Plug in a few nuggets, put your glass bottle under the spout and out pours a whole litre of foaming, cream-rich delight.  The first taste is a revelation, rich, bounteous and fulsome, like tasting real milk for the very first time.  It’s impeccably clean and fresh, whipping through the mouth with lactic élan, and leaving nothing behind save a lingering, luscious sigh.  It’s milk, Jim, but not as we know it.   Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under News

Cheese expert a fan of the raw milk kind

From Joe Bonwich, in St. Louis Today:

Cheese master Max McCalman. Photo via St. Louis Today.

“Renowned cheese expert Max McCalman will be in town this week to lead cheese tastings and sign books, but don’t be surprised if he slips in some evangelism for raw-milk cheeses.

“I feel very passionate about them, and I’ve studied them extensively,” McCalman says. “Raw-milk cheese has a great food-safety record. We can eat raw oysters and eat raw meat in this country if we want to, but not raw-milk cheese. There’s something wrong with that, especially since cheese hasn’t been implicated in as many food-poisoning issues as raw seafood, raw meat or even raw vegetables.” Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under News

Raw milk gelato in 1950s Italy — that is, until the health department intervened

From Stephanie Cesca in The Toronto Star:

Making Gelato in Italy from raw milk in the 1950s. Photo via Toronto Star.

“…To make sure they didn’t blow it, my mom, two of her sisters and a family friend spent last summer in Bologna, Italy, at the Carpigiani Gelato University. There, they learned why gelato-making calls for the passion of an artist and the precision of a scientist: One wrong move — like one extra teaspoon of sugar — and your masterpiece is finito. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under News

So what’s so good about raw milk?

From Justin Robertson on Post City.com (website of a Toronto based newspaper chain):

Michael Schmidt and some of his supporters leaving the court on Friday

“Last week, Michael Schmidt incurred a hefty slap-on-the-wrist (to the tune of $9,150) for charges related to selling raw milk. Not only that, he racked up two separate probation sentences for offences dating back to 2006. The guy clearly loves his raw milk. The government clearly does not. So what exactly is the deal with raw milk anyway? What makes it special enough to die for (or at least to abstain from eating for over a month)? Below, five reasons why raw milk has a cult following.

1. Taste the delicious taste. Of course, advocates will try to convince you that raw milk is the best tasting thing to happen to humanity since manna. But one thing is certain: raw milk certainly tastes different. Here is a pretty thorough breakdown of what to expect if taking the plunge.  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under News

NPR reviews new book, “Tomatoland”

From the story “How Industrial Farming ‘Destroyed’ the Tasty Tomato” on NPR:

Tomatoland, the book

“If you bite into a tomato between the months of October and June, chances are that tomato came from Florida. The Sunshine State accounts for one-third of all fresh tomatoes produced in the United States — and virtually all of the tomatoes raised during the fall and winter seasons.

But the tomatoes grown in Florida differ dramatically from the red garden varieties you might grow in your backyard. They’re bred to be perfectly formed — so that they can make their way across the U.S. and onto your dinner table without cracking or breaking.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under News