Tag Archives: The Tyee

Competition for “ultimate evil” brand?

It would really take a dedicated blog to keep up with the flow of GMO news and information out there these days. Although the Bovine is primarily focused on raw milk, we do sometimes give a nod to other issues in the food rights sphere. And while raw milk has always been a minority concern, GMOs in food will affect everyone. What will our children’s children think about this time in history when they look back from 2050 or so? The following is from Jon Rappoport’s blog:

What will the children think? Click image for photo source.

I recognized my two selves: a crusading idealist and a cold, granitic believer in the law of the jungle” – Edgar Monsanto Queeny, Monsanto chairman, 1943-63, “The Spirit of Enterprise”, 1934.

Monsanto should not have to vouchsafe the safety of biotech food. Our interest is in selling as much of it as possible. Assuring its safety is the F.D.A.’s job” – Phil Angell, Monsanto’s director of corporate communications. “Playing God in the Garden” New York Times Magazine, October 25, 1998. Continue reading

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BC ready to experiment with pot reform; So how about raw milk?

From Allison Griner, in The Tyee:

420 celebration at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Photo Clayton Perry via The Tyee’s Photo Pool.

“In 2009, three gunshot-wound patients were wheeled into Wood’s emergency room at Vancouver General Hospital, all victims of gang violence. Wood had to ask himself: why? As he began to pore over research about organized crime, he discovered how central the marijuana trade was to funding gangs around British Columbia.

Stirred to arms, Wood and a coalition of academics and professionals founded Stop the Violence BC which has been lobbying for the taxation and regulation of the marijuana industry. Continue reading

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One big step for big city farming

From Colleen Kimmett in The Tyee:

‘This is not a token thing. This is a real amount of food.’ SOLEfood Urban Farm’s two-acre operation in the heart of Vancouver, BC. Photo: Colleen Kimmett. (via The Tyee)

“Nearly 3,000 rectangular planter boxes, which stand out in varying shades of green and brown against a concrete parking lot, make for an impressive sight when viewed from high above on the Georgia Street viaduct.

Situated on Pacific Boulevard between the busy overpass, BC Place Stadium, and the bustling seawall at False Creek, SOLEfood Urban Farm’s newest (and, at two acres, its largest) site is a highly-visible sign that urban agriculture has arrived in Vancouver. Continue reading

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In British Columbia’s heartland, healthy food can be surprisingly hard to find

From Colleen Kimmett, writing for the Tyee:

Once a breadbasket, Bella Coola hosts a Community Supported Agriculture project. "The project opened up a lot of people's eyes to growing more food here. Bella Coola used to be the breadbasket for the Central Coast. That has all faded away -- but the potential is still there."

“It’s a good day in Dease Lake when a produce truck breaks down on the Cassiar highway.

For residents in and around this remote northern community, fresh produce can be hard to come by, especially in the winter. Continue reading

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Raw milk warriors of British Columbia

From Evan Duggan, writing in The Tyee, today:

Michael Schmidt, left, and Alice Jongerden protest health authorities in Chilliwack, B.C. Photo: The Valley Voice.

“Three agents wearing HAZMAT masks and gloves arrived at the restaurant on 1600 MacKay Road in North Vancouver flashing badges. They demanded that the staff lead them to the back. They seized some samples, and dumped the rest down the drain and down the toilet.

The agents were from the Fraser Health Authority, and the place was Barbara Schellenberg’s Ethical Kitchen.

The contraband was milk. Raw milk. Continue reading

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How can Canada “outlaw” a potato?

This excerpt is from The Tyee where the story, by Joanne Will, was titled “The Potato Underground”:

Mug shot of the outlaw potato in question.

“When Jerry LeBourdais learned that big agribusiness couldn’t handle the Cariboo potato, he knew he’d found a variety that he wanted to support. The name didn’t hurt either. If there was a potato out there named “Cariboo,” it had a natural home on the back-to-the-land commune near Williams Lake that LeBourdais had founded.

All he needed was some seed. It sounded simple enough.

“Jerry wanted to get a hold of some, and asked me where,” recalls John Ryser, a prize-winning seed potato farmer who lives south of Prince George. Ryser told him it wouldn’t be easy, because the potato had been decertified for seed production in 1976. By the time LeBourdais came calling in 1983, the Cariboo spud had been banned for seven years and Ryser had given up growing the variety.

“I kept the Cariboo going for years,” says Ryser. “The big cheeses de-listed it because it would hang on to the vines.” Government officials may prohibit varieties for reasons ranging from disease susceptibility to a tendency to snarl farm equipment; industrial potato farmers want plants that harvest easily with machinery. “Once a variety is de-listed, if you grow it, they’ll cancel your seed grower’s licence.” Continue reading

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