Tag Archives: Urban

“Victory” gardens in Drummondville

From Roger at Kitchen Gardeners:

Photo via Kitchen Gardeners.

“Dear Kitchen Gardener,

At the risk of sounding immodest, let me say just this: we ROCK!

By “we” I mean the over 30,000 gardeners who took action over the past three weeks in support of the food garden cause. Together, we helped win not just one victory but two.  The first and most important was the Drummondville front yard garden case which attracted over 30,000 petition signatures, significant international media attention and what seemed to be an endless parade of supportive emails (I stopped counting after the first 200).  Continue reading

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Backyard chickens should “fly the coop”, local editorial writer suggests

From Crystal Crimi in the Northumberland News:

U.S. government encourages backyard chickens, circa 1918

“It’s time for the chickens to fly their backyard coop in residential Campbellford.

After months of dealing with the Bacher family and the seven hens they keep in their Doxsee Avenue backyard, the municipality is taking them to court for a zoning violation. If successful, the charge comes with a maximum fine of $25,000 — that’s a lot of eggs.

But not enough to make the Bachers give up their hens. They’re fighting the charge with the pro bono services of Belleville lawyer Karen Selick — the same woman who represented Michael Schmidt, an Ontario dairy farmer convicted last fall for offences relating to selling raw milk.  Continue reading

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Food security and its urban challenges

The experience of New Orleans in the wake of hurricane Katrina highlights the structural challenges involved in feeding cities. Here’s an excerpt from a story in The Nation titled “Green Shoots in New Orleans“, accompanied by a link to a TED talk with Carolyn Steele, titled “How do we feed a city?”:

Click image to go to the video on the Sociological Images blog

“Margarine, margarine, ‘I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter.'” Poppy Tooker recalls the months of food shortages after Hurricane Katrina ripped the Gulf Coast apart. “I could not believe there was no butter.” Continue reading

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